Should you accept that counter-offer? While it may be tempting, research shows that accepting a counter-offer can be hazardous to your career.

Using a counter-offer to get what you want is risky. Not only does it undermine your commitment to the team, it gives your employer the leeway to anticipate your eventual jump-ship and maybe even beat you to the punch. Studies have shown that 50-80% of employees who accept counter-offers leave their employers within 6-12 months, either voluntarily or involuntarily.

Company loyalty is valued. A counter-offer can appear flattering, but don’t let emotions cause you to lose sight of your original objectives. Second guessing your decision to move forward and stick with the safe and familiar is normal, but may not be in your best interest. Read on to find out why, and keep in mind that Recruitment Partners are here to help you through these situations. Get in touch with us to find an effective solution to the counter-offer you’ve been presented.

Nine Important Reasons for Not Accepting a Counter-Offer

  1. You made the decision to to pursue change because you felt that another opportunity would better fit your career needs. When the “smoke clears” those reasons will still be there.
  2. Why did it take the the threat of your departure for your employer to recognize your worth? Where is the money for the counteroffer coming from? Is it your raise early? Companies have strict wage and salary guidelines which they generally are not going to change just for you.
  3. Are they just buying time? Your company may immediately start looking for your replacement at a lower salary. Market research is key. Establish what you are worth before you make any big decisions.
  4. An elephant never forgets. When tough times come, your employer may begin the cutbacks with you.
  5. Strength is, well, strong. Accepting a counter-offer can seem unsure and indecisive. Know what you want and know that you deserve it!
  6. It may seem harsh, but chances are good that the reasons for a counter-offer have more to do with inconvenience and avoidance of change than your indispensability to the company.
  7. Statistics show that if you accept a counter-offer, the probability of voluntarily leaving six months or being let go within one year is extremely high. By that time, your new opportunity will almost certainly be gone.
  8. Accepting a counter-offer is most likely an emotional rather than an intellectual decision. Deep breath. Find your happy place. Rethink. Move forward!
  9. A counter-offer is always a result of a resignation. Will you have to threaten to quit every time you want to advance within this company?